Liver and Spleen Trauma

Pamela Choi, M.D., Alicia G Sykes, M.D., M.A., James M Prieto, M.D., Steven Stylianos, MD, Robert W Letton, MD, Barbara A. Gaines, MD
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Introduction

Abdominal injuries are the third most common cause of traumatic death and affect about 10% of injured children, with the spleen and liver the most frequently injured organs.[1] Both the liver and spleen are very vascular organs, and significant injury can result in life-threatening hemorrhage. However, the vast majority of liver and spleen injuries can be managed nonoperatively. Nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt liver and spleen injury is highly effective and has become the standard of care. The establishment of treatment algorithms supporting nonoperative management has led to decreases in periods of bedrest, the overall length of stay, and unnecessary resource utilization.

Content in this module is referenced in SCOREAbdominal Trauma overview

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Introduction

Abdominal injuries are the third most common cause of traumatic death and affect about 10% of injured children, with the spleen and liver the most frequently injured organs.[1] Both the liver and spleen are very vascular organs, and significant injury can result in life-threatening hemorrhage. However, the vast majority of liver and spleen injuries can be managed nonoperatively. Nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt liver and spleen injury is highly effective and has become the standard of care. The establishment of treatment algorithms supporting nonoperative management has led to decreases in periods of bedrest, the overall length of stay, and unnecessary resource utilization.

Content in this module is referenced in SCOREAbdominal Trauma overview

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Last updated: January 20, 2022